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Board Governance and Development Webinar

Did you miss the LeadingAge Board Governance and Development Webinar with FSA’s Jane Mack and Kendal Corporation’s Nora Adelmann earlier this spring? Discussed during the webinar were best practices and tools for the four core aspects of board development: Identification and Recruitment, Education, Involvement and Evaluation of board members.

We’re happy to report that the webinar recording is live, so if you didn’t attend, you can watch it all here.

Being Community

Member Buzz

We polled staff at each and every FSA member organization to see what stood out for them most last year. The answers varied, but one thing was for certain: staff members sure are proud of what's happening at their organizations! Below are some highlights.


Tell us about an act of kindness you witnessed at your organization.

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What The Lion King has in common with FSA Peer Groups.

What The Lion King has in common with FSA Peer Groups.

“Pink pajamas penguins at the bottom. Pink paja-“

Oh... you mean those aren’t the words to the song at the beginning of The Lion King?

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FSA Happenings 2020

The end of year is always busy: projects come to a close and new ones are dreamed up. Here’s a quick recap of recent happenings, and a look to what’s ahead…

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Diversity Peer Group

Earlier this month, a group of FSA members gathered with co-facilitators Marsha Wesley Coleman and consultant Michael Gagné to talk about their organizations’ efforts to implement diversity programming. Gagné presented the following guidelines to assist organizations.

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FSA Internship Program Leads to New Career Path

Emily Vassoler was on track to work within the hospitality business. As a Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Management major at Penn State University Park, she had gotten some experience working within her chosen field. And she was frustrated.

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Member Stories: If you give a horse a haircut...

Who would have thought that a horse could change a life? Andy Switzer did. Though he’s been Director of Health and Wellness with Broadmead for three years, it was at his previous job where he first saw the benefit of involving residents in Equine Therapy. So, when the opportunity presented itself for Broadmead to begin working with horses, the organization collaborated with John Hopkins University to develop an individualized Equine Therapy program.

Now, in partnership with locally based  Rose of Sharon Equestrian School, Broadmead runs five-week therapy programs in the spring and fall. Residents who are diagnosed with Dementia or another cognitive impairment are chosen because of their interest in or experience with horses. Residents’ families are involved in the decision-making process in conjunction with a sign-off from Broadmead's Medical Director.

Participating residents get the opportunity to participate in the care of the horses with a focus on groomsmanship: one resident even got to give a horse a haircut! During their time in the program, each resident gets to work with one particular horse for the duration of the five weeks and receives a photo of their horse to take home with them. Those who are wheelchair bound, or those who may have trouble standing for long periods of time, get to work with one of the program’s two mini-horses.

According to Andy, the most exciting thing about the program is seeing evidence that patients are benefiting. In the two years that Broadmead has been running the program, Andy noted the vibrancy of the residents who participate. He shared the story of a mostly non-verbal gentleman who became more verbal when he was with the horses, including sharing details of memories from working with horses earlier in his life. The gentleman’s wife was particularly astonished as they were details she herself hadn’t heard. This experience was not limited to this gentleman alone, Andy remembered another woman who was non-verbal who began to smile more, put sentences together, and remember the horses' names during her time in the program.

If you give a horse a haircut – the residents might benefit!